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Movement and Animals Increase

the Effectiveness of Literacy Learning

 Bob-a-loo engages children with movement-based learning adventures and our fabulous, feathered friend Alfie helps bring reading to life. The evidence-based  Bob-a-loo program is designed to work in harmony with any early education curriculum (birth to age eight). Every activity page is designed to promote movement while learning, using the universal appeal of animals.

 

Learn with Alfie!

Teaching Tools Guide

Learn more about how to use the teaching tools effectively in the classroom.

Teaching Tools Printouts

Download songs, outdoor activities, movement learning, and fun pages. 

Educational Videos

Brain Breaks, Letter Learning, Phonics, and sightwords

Movement

Research demonstrates that children retain information better when they move.

Movement and Literacy

When children move over, under, around, though, beside, and near objects and others, they better grasp the meaning of these prepositions. When they perform a “slow walk” or skip “lightly,” adjectives and adverbs become much more than abstract ideas. When they’re given the opportunity to physically demonstrate such action words as stomp, pounce, stalk, or slither—or descriptive words such as smooth, strong, gentle, or enormous—word comprehension is immediate and long lasting. The words are used and learned in context, as opposed to being a mere collection of letters. This is what promotes emergent literacy and a love of language.

Learning by Doing

Learning by doing creates more neural networks in the brain and throughout the body, making the entire body a tool for learning. There is a growing body of research determining that physical activity activates the brain much more so than doing seat-work. It can help increase memory, perception, language, attention, emotion and even decision making.

Multiple Sensory Processes

While engaged in movement activities children use multiple sensory processes, which create neural connections across numerous pathways in the brain. The branching of these connections is the first step in wiring the brain for all future learning.

Additional Benefits

While imitating animal actions children experience cross-lateral movement, which helps them cross the body’s midline and activates both hemispheres of the brain. These movements involve both eyes, ears, hands, and feet, as well as core muscles on both sides of the body, causing activation of both hemispheres and all four lobes of the brain. This means cognitive functioning is heightened.

We use animals to help demonstrate ideas

Natural Love

Humans have a natural affinity for animals that is evident very early in life.

Reduce Fear

When used to introduce movement and learning, animals help reduce competition and fear of failure; there is no perfect move to master–no wrong way to “hop” like a rabbit. Everyone can succeed at their own level, feeling a sense of accomplishment.

Motivation

Children naturally gravitate toward animals and are motivated to learn and imitate the sounds and moves they make.

Additional Benefits

While imitating animal actions children experience cross-lateral movement, which helps them cross the body’s midline and activates both hemispheres of the brain. These movements involve both eyes, ears, hands, and feet, as well as core muscles on both sides of the body, causing activation of both hemispheres and all four lobes of the brain. This means cognitive functioning is heightened.

Introduction to Learning Sections

Understanding Sections

If your busy learners are at the beginning of letter recognition you may choose to start with Section 1: See, Say and Move. If they are more advanced, you may choose to start with Section 2 or 3.

Section 1

Letters Recognition

Section 2

Phonics

Section 3

Site Words 

See, Say & Move 

Do & Go Sound Search

Read & Romp

The first section is an introduction to letters. It is called See, Say and Move.

See the letter. Say the letter. Say the animal and do the Animal Move.

There are several activity pages for each letter to mix and match throughout the week to bolster early educational curriculum.

You may choose to add some of the songs and phonics pages in Section 2 and 3. They are designed to be used together as children progress.

Section 1: Letters

This section involves “doing” an activity and “going” outside to explore whenever possible, while practicing the letter sound. This is the introduction to phonics.

Section 1: Letters

This section is an introduction to site words. It involves reading stories, introducing more phonics activities, letter combinations like “Ch” and site words. 

Read a sentence or a complete story and romp (play energetically) along.

Section 1: Letters

Inspiration

We have detailed pages for each section. There you will find links to suggested videos, and suggestions for how to best utilize the teaching tools.

We have detailed pages for each section. There you will find links to suggested videos, and suggestions for how to best utilize the teaching tools.